COLLECTION RÊVE DE KIMONO

Craftsmanship

The kimono commissioned by Clé de Peau Beauté, created in collaboration with Tachibana, an embroidery and dyeing studio in Kyoto that plays a role in preserving kimono culture. Crafted using a valuable dyeing technique called Surigata-Yuzen, which uses dozens of stencils to dye different patterns, layering one color over another.

Also partnering with Clé de Peau Beauté on Collection Rêve de Kimono, Japanese painter Ayana Otake. Her paintings gracing each item’s packaging, depicting a woman wearing a kimono, her character reflected in her pose.

Tachibana
Tachibana
Kyoto Embroidery & Dyeing Studio
Ayana Otake
Ayana Otake
Painter

Tachibana

Kyoto Embroidery & Dyeing Studio

Since Tachibana’s foundation in 1947, its colorful works have been captivating kimono fans.

Founder Zenzo Sodesaki (born in 1911) learned the basics of making kimono at Chiso, a traditional Japanese textile producer and one of the oldest yuzen coloring companies in Kyoto.

Current representative Yohei Kawai is the third generation, following Zenzo Sodesaki and second generation president, Kenichi Kawai.

A kimono created in collaboration with Kyoto’s Tachibana Studio. Dyed in the color of #512 Red Passion Lipstick Cashmere. The plum flowers in the design, the soft pink of #511 Silk Passion.

The Surigata-Yuzen method uses dozens of stencils to dye patterns onto kimono silk, layering one color over another to produce a gradation. Thirty-four stencils were used to create the patterns of the red Tachibana kimono.

Every gradation is done by hand, adding another layer to the painstaking art of the kimono. Kimono culture and heritage have been carried through the ages by the handcraft of the artisans.

For each color, dyeing is repeated in different tones; the layers achieving a complex and extraordinary beauty. Colors for the red kimono were exclusively selected to match the Clé de Peau Beauté limited edition collection.

Hikizome – dyeing the the entire silk cloth by brush. The patterns are protected by natural glue.

To make a kimono is to live by the laws of nature. So as not to alter the natural drying process, temperature condition is maintained the same throughout the year. The fate of the color finish is in the hands of nature, as the outcome is never the same.

Ayana Otake

Painter

Born in Saitama in 1981, Otake-san grew up surrounded by traditional culture and kimono.

In 2007, she graduated in the Japanese Painting from the Department of Painting at Tokyo University of the Arts.

She has produced works for galleries and department stores in Tokyo, and also practices bookbinding and package design.

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